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  • iSchool Professor Earns Lindback Award For Excellence in Teaching

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013

    iSchool Professor Earns Lindback Award For Excellence in Teaching

    May 28, 2013

    Assistant Professor Michelle Rogers, Ph.D., of Drexel’s iSchool, College of Information Science and Technology, was awarded the 2012- 2013 Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching. This honor—which recognizes Rogers’ demonstrated excellence and innovation in teaching—was presented at the Drexel University Faculty Recognition Dinner on May 22, 2013 in Behrakis Grand Hall. She will also receive an acknowledgement at the University’s 126th Commencement Ceremonies on June 15, 2013.

    Rogers is the fifth iSchool faculty member to receive this award; Associate Professor Denise Agosto, Ph.D. (2007), Professor Il-Yeol Song, Ph.D. (2001), Associate Professor Carl Drott, Ph.D. (1979), and Professor Emeritus John C. Hall, Ph.D. (1977) all previously received Lindback Awards.

    In April 2013, Rogers was among a select group of Midcareer Consultants to receive one of the 12-month grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Connections program. The grant allows Rogers to capitalize on the strengths of information and communication technologies to address issues of childhood obesity by (1) testing the viability of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) as a means of evaluating mobile interventions in the US; and by (2) identifying the barriers and facilitators to use of mobile devices to support behavior change.

    Rogers also works within the Drexel University Institute for Healthcare Informatics (IHI)—an initiative based at the iSchool, in collaboration with Drexel’s College of Nursing and Health Professions (CNHP), the School of Public Health (SPH) and the College of Medicine (DUCoM).

    Rogers' primary research interests center on how peoples’ use of information technology in complex settings changes their work. Her current work is focused on understanding the impact of clinical information systems on the work processes of health care practitioners. She is particularly interested in the role of technology in patient safety, job design and user-centered design. Her major teaching areas are healthcare informatics, human-computer interaction and human factors engineering.

    Rogers received her master’s and doctorate in industrial engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with a concentration was in socio-technical systems (i.e., human factors and ergonomics). Her professional experience includes a research scientist position at the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Getting at Patient Safety (GAPS) Center, where she worked on applying scenario-based usability testing and cognitive work analysis to study how electronic medical records impacted patient safety and clinicians work flow.


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